Archive for the ‘Slitherlink’ Category:

Liar Slitherlink

Yay first post by chaotic_iak *insert shameless advertising he– wait I already have*

To begin my double-posting adventure, I’ll crosspost my Puzzle 39 here.

Liar Slitherlink. Follow regular Slitherlink rules. In addition, exactly one number from each row/column is false.

Answer key: Enter the number of cells inside the loop in each row from top to bottom without separators. If there are 10 cells inside the loop, put 0.

Puzzle 1: Liar Slitherlink

Unlike in my blog (linked above), I will not write stories for each puzzle here. Go there for stories. I will also post a puzzle here only if I think it’s good. Well, this one is average in my current standards, but it’s a good introduction to my style of puzzles…maybe.

…or well, maybe I’ll post here more often, because I can’t have the fave/solved API in my WordPress blog. As you see above, I have an answer key here. Blah why I can’t have the API in my WordPress blog. *insert rant here*

Archive for the ‘Slitherlink’ Category:

Liar Slitherlink

Here is a new Slitherlink puzzle for you to try. This puzzle is based on Floret Pentagonal Tiling, which was suggested to me by Danny Sichel. The additional clue styles (ampersand and dollar sign) were inspired by David Millar’s excellent “Area 51″ puzzles, which you’ll find at The Griddle. If you like this puzzle, you can download six of them here.

Floret Slitherlink

Fill in some of the dotted line segments to form a meandering path that forms a single loop. The path does not cross itself, branch, or touch itself at corners. The numbers indicate how many line segments surround each cell. Empty cells may be surrounded by any number of line segments.

A dollar sign ($) indicates the cell is inside the loop. An ampersand (&) indicates the cell is outside the loop.

There is one unique solution, and you should be able to find it without guessing. You may find it helpful to mark segments that cannot be filled in.

Archive for the ‘Slitherlink’ Category:

Liar Slitherlink

Unlike the others here, I am not a prolific puzzle author… or a speed solver… or even an expert solver.  However, like the other authors here, I love puzzles.

My current favourite puzzle types are slitherlink, masyu, and other loop type puzzles… and their variants. (Yes, I spelled favourite that way intentionally – I am Australian).  In addition to posting up some puzzles for you to solve, I also intend to put up some tutorials aimed at pure beginners.

I planned to do a slitherlink tutorial, but there are a number of good ones out there already (particularly the Conceptis one), so felt there was no need to reinvent the wheel.  Instead, you can practice those techniques on the below puzzle: (Easy possibly tending towards Medium)

Slitherlink puzzle

My first slitherlink

Archive for the ‘Slitherlink’ Category:

Liar Slitherlink

Hi Folks,

This is my first contribution to Perplexibles. I’m calling this a “Septigon Slitherlink”. This is 7-fold variation of the Snowflake Slitherlinks, one of many unusual Slitherlinks that you can find on my puzzle site, Krazydad.

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Archive for the ‘Slitherlink’ Category:

Liar Slitherlink

Jim of KrazyDad.com fame suggested I kick off this blog with an inaugural post to set some sort of direction for it. What I envisioned is being able to provide a venue for established puzzle authors and occasional authors or newcomers to mix it up and just have a place to post puzzles and share them with an audience. That’s what I wanted when I started The Griddle 6 years ago, when a friend helped me get hosting and start fleshing out the site with content and code so that I could share the puzzles I’d made for friends, classmates, and teachers with a whole new audience.

So I guess that’s where I’m coming from as far as the spirit of the blog. As far as actual content and style, I envisioned something more like what Thomas Snyder, Palmer Mebane, and Grant Fikes do, with straight up puzzles, and maybe a bit of editorial commentary here and there. In fact, this puzzle is inspired by puzzle variations seen in motris’s blog, as well as a hybrid type I’ve posted on The Griddle and in Sudoku Xtra in the past. It’s a 6/9 Flip Slithery Sum Sudoku, which is a mouthful.

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